2019 Executive/Tailored Courses On Offer

Overview

The course provides an in-depth analysis of the implementation aspects of trade defense instruments. In this context, it focuses on safeguard measures, anti-dumping and subsidies and countervailing measures. The course is cast within the regional integration context while also capturing key aspects of trade defense instruments applicability at the global trade. The course is offered in realization of the fact that most sub-Saharan African countries have low conceptualization of trade defense instruments as well as the fact that they are generally ill-equipped to make use of these instruments under potentially legitimate circumstances. Therefore, the course covers a triad of instruments, namely, dumping, subsidies and countervailing measures and safeguards.

Under dumping, the key areas of concentration are: fact-based investigation in establishing requisite conditions for application of the particular measure; analysis of WTO disciplines related to anti-dumping and; various anti- dumping procedures and investigations. The course will look into legal documents underpinning anti-dumping actions; how to establish whether imported goods are being dumped; how to establish whether the dumped imports are causing or threatening to cause injury to the domestic industry; how to determine the level of anti-dumping duties; procedures to be followed in initiating and conducting investigations, including the collection of information and; procedures for review and termination of anti-dumping duties.

Regarding subsidies and countervailing measures, similar procedure that regarding investigations will be closely scrutinized with exclusive focus on application aspects. The course will look into applicability of multilateral disciplines as well as unilateral use of countervailing measures to offset injury incurred from subsidized imports. It will scrutinize forms of countervailing measures as well as overall rules on the application of countervailing measures.

Last but not least, focus will be paid to Safeguards in respect of procedural aspects, conditions for application and most importantly associated investigations. The investigational aspects will include how key fact are gathered and established as well as how they are analysed. Various ways in which safeguard measures are applied will be analysed, in particular, the provisional and definitive safeguards. The course is highly applied and it will make use of case studies and simulations so as to accord participants reading deployable skills

Expected learning outcomes

  • Conceptualize various trade defense instruments

  • Discern and distinguish regional and international dimensions of trade defense instruments application

  • Acquire hands on skills on how to carry out trade defense investigations and apply requisite measures

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Arusha Tanzania.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 4th March – 8th March 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org, or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Trade liberalization both in the context of trade in goods and services continue to occupy a centre stage in African countries bid to transform their economies. At both multilateral and regional levels, implementation of commitments by countries reveal a gap between their expectations from their trade liberalization commitments and the implementation realities they face. In this context, the balance between countries’ rights and obligations is very difficult to strike. Key to this difficulty is shortcomings related to regulatory aspects of international trade in goods and services. Specific to the African countries, commitments made by countries and their attendant expectations are mostly hard to actualize owing to underdeveloped regulatory environment. There is also lack of rationalization of commitments made and attendant regulatory reforms that must be undertaken. The inability of countries to go past their negotiated trade agreements templates and conceptualize viability of these agreements at the regulatory level characterizes outcomes of most multilateral and regional trade agreements. Moreover, the inability of countries to reconcile their right to regulate expected economic benefits from their international commitments remains at the center stage of their failure to actualize their perceived expectations. In addition, inability to reconcile cross-border dimension of trade in goods and services with regulatory measures of various countries adds further to the above highlighted challenges.

Another challenge that emerges from most multilateral and regional trade agreements relates to inability of countries to conceptualize various chapters of agreements under negotiations as an integrated whole. Drawing the inter-linkages between rights and obligations across distinct subject matter negotiated by countries is key challenge that has negatively affected the level of ambition in trade agreements. In the same manner, collective assessment of subject matter under implementation or negotiations as against economic interests of countries is not only extremely rare but it is a reflection of lack of capacity and competence to rationalize negotiated issues within the context of a myriad of regulations that span a good number of sectors.

The course on trade liberalization and the right to regulate introduces participants to non-tariff measures within a context of regional integration in Africa. The course considers the pros and cons of domestic regulation and the right to regulate in international trade in goods and services. It further focuses on domestic application of trade agreements in the context of various services sectors including accreditation and mutual recognition agreements, SPS, TBT etc. Core to various questions interrogated by the course is the ability of countries to maintain, adopt or change regulations where countries are parties to trade agreements. Regulatory coherence and convergence within national and regional context as well as their impact of trade liberalization and perceived benefits are also core questions dealt with by the course. In a nutshell the course considers regulatory aspects of international trade in goods and services.

Expected training outcomes

  • Ability to think critically, strategically and independently on trade regulation subject matter 

  • Acquiring conceptual, theoretical and applied knowledge of regulatory aspects of international trade 

  • Identifying and opining regulatory aspects of international trade in goods and services with national, regional and international contexts 

  • Understanding the rational behind adoption, maintenance and changes of trade regulations at the national and regional levels 

  • Rationalizing on a cross sectional basis, trade liberalization related commitments and the perceived benefits as against prevailing regulatory environment at national and regional levels 

  • Exposing participants to the political economy questions of domestic, regional and international trade regulation 

  • Exposé of best practices in trade in good and services regulation through case studies 


 

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 2 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Kigali, Rwanda.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 18th March – 22nd March 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org, or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Rules of origin have become one of the challenging components of preferential trading arrangements both in terms of negotiations and implementation. The main challenge arises from the nature of the rules in terms of design and structure. The more complicated and stringent the rules of origin are the more uncertain they become for the traders. Much as there has been an increasing conclusion of preferential trading regimes involving most sub-Saharan African countries, the intra-trade within these trading regimes has not grown in tandem. This outcome is mostly attributed to complicated rules of origin. Among African Regional Economic Communities, product specific rules of origin are increasingly defining the structure of the rules. This is event in SADC, EAC and the yet to be concluded tripartite FTA. To be development friendly, rules of origin need to be simple and user-friendly to foster uptake by exporters and enhance utilization rates of preferences.
The course is deigned to equip the participants with conceptual skills on rules of origin and the implication of the different types. This will be important to enhance capacity in the design of the rules for ongoing FTA negotiations and to foster implementation of concluded rules of origin. The pursuit of industrialization by most African countries will be realized if the preferential trading regimes they belong to have simple, predictable and user-friendly rules of origin.
The training programme is designed for policy-makers and trade and customs advisers, trade negotiators. It is will be useful to key persons in major business or trade organisations as well as persons within the academia who are or will be involved in issues of rules of origin.

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically and independently,

  • An appreciation of how the rules of origin have shaped the preference utilisation

  • A deep understanding of the conceptual complexities of rules of origin,

  • An advanced knowledge of rules of origin,
  • A highly developed global mindset with a grasp of rules of origin,

  • An enhanced understanding of the implications of rules of origin on intra-regional trade.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Arusha Tanzania.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

 

Dates: 1st April – 5th March 2019.

 

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org, or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

The course provides an in-depth analysis of political economy dimension underpinning African regional and economic integration as well as historical perspectives behind African trade and economic integration. If further recasts the concept of preferentialism in international trade within a broader discourse on the relationship between regionalism and multilateralism. Furthermore, it interrogates the notion of sovereignty in an integrating world as well as the emergence nationalism as a corollary to trade and economic integration. Moreover, the course assesses the level of ambition set out in African regional trade agreements as against regulatory realities not subject to RTA disciplines as well as the implications of shifting approach to trade among nations to the bilateral level.

The course importantly takes a strong theoretical and applied approach to African trade and economic integration. In the first instance, the course tackles conceptual and theoretical fundamentals of international trade law and economics of international trade as applied to African regional trade and economic integration. It covers in depth, the legal underpinnings and key principles upon which regional trade agreements are based. These include complexities relating to MFN clauses and their implications, standstill and roll back provisions, infant industry protection clauses, sensitive lists, overlapping membership, scope of coverage in respect of GATT Article XXIV, GATS Article V and WTO plus issues. In the second instance the course focuses on the economics of region- al trade and economic integration. It employs relevant data analysis tools and methodologies, covers economic rational behind regional integration through undertaking an in-depth analysis of trade data and deciphers various scenarios and their impact and implications on individual countries, regions and the African Continent as a whole as against the rest of the world. The course rationalizes trade data as against investment flows and delves into the meaning of trade data in the context of value added trade and trade in tasks.

Beyond conceptual and theoretical perspectives, pragmatism defines this course. It therefore adopts a case study approach at an applied level. The course uses case studies involving African regional economic communities from the prism of broad African economic integration as espoused by the African Union instruments including the Abuja Treaty.

The case studies cover SADC, EAC, COMESA, TRIPARTITE, UEMOA, ECOWAS, IGAD, ECCAS, proposed CFTA, SACU etc. The course makes further use of case studies involving trade arrangements between Africa and third parties such as EPA, EBA, AGOA and various GSP schemes. Moreover, it involves regional and economic integration experiences and recent developments from other regions including plurilaterals and mega-regionals and their relevance and impact on African Regional trade and economic integration.

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically and independently,

  • An acquirement of conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of economic and legal foundations of regional trade and economic integration

  • A deep understanding of the meaning and relevance of economic and legal aspects of regional trade arrangements and their implications and impact on individual countries, regions, African Continent as well as relationship of African countries with third parties
  • 
A deep appreciation of the conceptual complexities and opportunities within the context of African agenda on trade liberalization and economic integration

  • An advanced knowledge of existing and prospective African regional integration trading schemes,

  • A multi-dimensional appreciation of approaches to regional trade and economic integration

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Kigali, Rwanda

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 15th April – 19th April 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

The course is geared at improving the awareness and understanding of quantitative methods, which in turn can contribute to evaluations of development and poverty effects of negotiation positions and outcomes as well as domestic trade-related policy choices. The course is primarily designed for those who have some prior exposure to economic statistics and quantitative economic analysis and have, or expect to have, specialist positions as trade policy analysts. It introduces common analytical methods and tools widely used for the purpose of quantifying likely effects of alternative trade agreement outcomes and trade policy options.

 

The objective of the course is to introduce the participants to key tools of analysis in common use among trade economists. This will cover hands on exercises with some partial equilibrium models and various trade indicators. The participants will have the chance to extract data from UN COMTRADE and the UNCTAD/World Bank WITS/TRAINS databases and to compute the indicators. Participants will also learn how to interpret the results of their work.

 

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically and independently,
  • An appreciation of quantitative trade policy analysis,

  • A knowledge of tools for basic trade analysis,
  • A developed global mindset with a grasp of international trade analysis and policy issues with a focus on LDCs,

  • An understanding of the role and nature of the various trade analysis policy tools

  • An enhanced understanding of the analysis on key issues such bilateral, regional, and multilateral international trade negotiations, agreements, institutions and related processes.

 

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 2 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Arusha Tanzania.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 29th April – 3rd May 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Training Venue

The course is scheduled to take place in Arusha, Tanzania from 7- 11 May 2018. However, subject agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any of the following venues: Dubai UAE; Kampala, Uganda, Mombasa, Kenya; Nairobi Kenya; Livingstone Zambia and Durban/Pretoria South Africa.

Overview

 

The services sector bears increasing relevance for economic diversification and development in Africa. However, this may only be possible if African Countries put in place policies that would enable them benefit from trade in services.

 

Consequently, this course aims at equipping participants with knowledge on key trade in services disciplines and their relevance in the process of preparing national regulations on services. This will be achieved through consideration of the following areas: structure of the General Agreement on Trade in Services and the key principles; key approaches in liberalization of trade in services; underlying concepts for Trade in Services negotiations; tips in scheduling commitments; utility of preferential services liberalization for African Countries; relevance of rules relating domestic regulation of trade in services under the GATS and their impact on ongoing domestic reform e orts in African Countries; and the need to situate service sector policy in national development plans.

 

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically

  • An appreciation of how the economic characteristics of services transactions have shaped the law of services trade,

  • A deep understanding of the conceptual complexities of liberalisation of trade in services,
  • Participants will be able to better estimate and analyse potential consequences of various options in services liberalization,

  • An advanced knowledge of the role of the GATS on domestic regulation of trade in services,

  • An enhanced understanding of the linkages between international trade in services and development.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Nairobi, Kenya/ Lagos, Nigeria

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 13th May – 17th May 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org  or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Over a couple of decades, transport and related ancillary service providers have increasingly developed into logistics companies. The reasons for and implications of this are manifold. These range from better asset utilization to the application of differentiation strategies through diversification into new fields of business. It is, however, not only traditional transport related operators that have diversified, completely new market entrants as well as industrial/trading companies have, on the basis of their own logistics requirements, entered the market as third party suppliers. For freight forwarding companies, diversification into multimodal transport and logistics services has been a logical consequence of the erosion of traditional freight forwarding markets and activities. They were, however, not the only profession seizing new opportunities, it has equally applied to modal transport operators, port, terminal and other operators, cargo handling companies, ware- housing companies, etc. These shifts and changes have come as a result of organizational and technological advancements. In all of them, the regulatory and facilitator’s role of the government remain key. There is therefore no question that the changes have brought about a challenges and opportunities to governments and relevant stakeholders in particular how they can foster trade facilitation. In consideration of multiple players engaged in the logistics chain and challenges surrounding reconciliation of myriad of sector specific regulations and practices as against the needs of service providers and the business community, the logistics-trade facilitation nexus has proven an important area to the rest of the world and more so to Africa.

This course considers the notion of logistics and transport services including intercontinental transport services. It further considers modal transport markets and their operational characteristics as well as multimodal transport. Logistics services and infrastructure in particular freight forwarding and logistics, logistics infrastructure and terminals as well as related facilities and lastly dedicated facilities such as logistics parks and private sector participation are covered by the course. The course explores the question of logistics policy focusing on areas such as logistics infrastructure, market access in its own right and in terms of national policies such as licensing and government regulation as against self-regulation. Further, policy areas explored by the course include facilitation and enabling policies as well as regional and international cooperation related policies. The policy dimension of the course is completed through exploration of specific steps towards achieving a comprehensive logistics policy and implementation. The interplay of logistics policies and trade facilitation measures is an important feature of the course. The role of trade facilitation in logistics and inter-relationship of the two concepts is key to this segment of the module. The course importantly tests the applicability of trade facilitation measures in the context on logistics framework and its ever-changing environment. More importantly, the course adopts an afro-centric approach while simultaneously injecting best practices and perspectives from other parts of the world.

In a nutshell, the logistics and trade facilitation course takes both conceptual and applied approaches as method of choice at course delivery stage. It benchmarks its applied aspects against the international best practices and contextualizes the course material within an African context. The course provides a very strong conceptual grasp of technical, theoretical and implementation aspects of logistics within the context of trade facilitation. The course balances policy issues with private sector interests thereby by fostering a collective understanding of policy and market place issues of importance.

Expected training outcomes

  • Ability to think critically, strategically and independently on the logistics and trade facilitation matters 

  • Acquiring conceptual, theoretical and applied underpinnings of the logistics and trade facilitation as well as their interrelationships 

  • Understanding the relevance of policy dimensions of logistics and trade facilitation on governments and traders at national, regional and international levels 

  • Understanding and acquiring the ability to analyze modal transport service characteristics and markets 

  • Understanding and conceptualizing shippers’ transport requirements 

  • Defining and analyzing Multimodal Transport State the relationship of a Multimodal 
Transport Operator (MTO) with the intervening parties. 

  • Describing and analyzing the scope of services offered by an MTO. 

  • Cultivating a deep appreciation of the conceptual and applied complexities and opportunities within the context of African agenda on trade facilitation and economic integration 

  • Obtaining advanced knowledge of existing and prospective trade facilitation related components of African regional integration trading schemes and related logistics initiatives 


Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Lusaka, Zambia

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 20th May – 24th May 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org, or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Trade negotiations have been a major preoccupation of almost all African countries. Parallel negotiations have generally become a defining feature of these negotiations. Despite lean structures that characterize most African countries’ administrations in charge of trade policy and trade negotiations, trade negotiations at bi- lateral, regional, at RTA and multilateral levels continue to preoccupy countries as they seek to open markets and deepen their trade ties. This course aims to build competencies and capacities of trade negotiators and further impart requisite skillset that characterize a successful trade negotiator.

The course on trade negotiations and cooperation introduces participants to the art and science of trade negotiations. It covers key features of international relations and principles that broadly de ne negotiations in their broader perspectives. The course delves deep into political economy questions that characterize trade negotiations at multilateral, regional, continental, RTA, bilateral and domestic levels. At a theoretical level, the course delves into the conceptual and implementation aspects of trade negotiations. The practice of negotiations and its attendant techniques and tactics, the types of negotiations, as well as purposes of the various types of negotiations are key features of the course. The course looks into the psychological aspects of negotiations and behavioral patterns that each negotiator must identify in any set of negotiations.

It further considers negotiation strategies and methods, phases of negotiation, cross cultural nature of negotiations, key players in trade negotiations, subject matter for trade negotiations and typology of players in trade negotiations and related rational for each of these aspects. Negotiations skills as a key ingredient to successful negotiations are considered in great depth. Moreover, communication methods in trade negotiations, characteristics of an effective negotiator, processes in trade negotiations diplomacy are important elements considered by the course.

Trade policy formulation process and the efficiency – effectiveness dichotomy in trade negotiations as well as development of a negotiations toolbox are hands on dimensions provided by the course. To this end, the course draws from real life experiences of faculty members in the context of bilateral negotiations, regional economic communities and multilateral trading system. This is achieved through negotiations simulations and role-playing scenarios. This ensures that participants do not only cultivate conceptual and theoretical aspects of trade negotiations but also application aspects from the African continent and other parts of trade negotiations. The course is facilitated 
by the world renowned trade negotiations practitioners.

 

Expected training outcomes

  • Ability to think critically, strategically and independently on any negotiation subject matter
  • Acquiring conceptual, theoretical and applied knowledge negotiation concepts

  • Obtaining hands on experience on how to engage in trade negotiations

  • Understanding the rational behind various formats of trade negotiations
  • Exposing participant to the political economy questions of domestic, regional and international trade negotiations
  • Acquiring requisite skills to prepare for and efficiently and effectively engage in trade negotiations
  • Understanding and conceptualizing negotiations strategies, tactics and techniques of trade negotiations, how and when to implement them.
  • Acquiring skills to de ne and distinguish negotiations interests and positions and deter mine their drivers
  • Cultivating competencies of a principled negotiator

  • Identifying various gambits and tactics used in negotiations and ability to strategies on the same.

  • Developing a negotiators toolbox akin to trade negotiations

 

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Nairobi, kenya.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 3rd June – 7th June 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Global trade in food and feed crops has accelerated over the period. Statistics have shown that over the years Agricultural trade increased by a factor of eight. However, at region level, only the Americas (North and Latin America) have a bigger share in exports of agricultural and food products, whereas the other major regions, especially Africa their share of agricultural exports is very small, partly due to failure to comply with standards.

Standards and conformity assessment have crucial underlying goals: not least, ensuring consumer safety and helping protect the environment. At the same time, businesses and governments around the world are concerned that behind-the-border measures such as product standards can have downsides for market access and international trade. Indeed, such measures, together with Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS), are often cited as major obstacles to trade, even ahead of tariffs. Consequently, this course provides an in-depth analysis of Multilateral trading system and trade facilitation, trends in agricultural trade and standards, the role of standards and SPS in agricultural and food trade, Standards facilitation at bilateral, regional and multilateral level; establishment of standards for international agricultural trade ; accreditation, public and private standards. The course uses case studies involving African Countries and Regional economic communities from African.

 

Who is it for?

The course is designed for policymakers, standards officers, technocrats and researchers involved in agricultural trade, and private industry captains involved in agricultural trade.

How participants will benefit.

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Think critically, strategically and independently,

  • Critically evaluate the WTO Agreements pertaining to Standards, Agriculture and Trade Facilitation
  • Identify areas where adjustments in agricultural policy and regulatory frameworks are needed to comply with the relevant standards
  • Demonstrate a deeper understanding of the impact of private food safety standards on trade in agricultural products; 

  • Critically examine the relationship between the SPS Agreement and the TFA.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Cape Town, South Africa

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 17th June – 21st June 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

The course provides an in-depth analysis of the implementation aspects of trade facilitation measures. In this context, it zeroes-in on cross-dimensionality of trade facilitation measures at implementation level. It further explores the consequence of trade facilitations with self contained policies arising from sector specific ministries and departments that are traditionally divorced from their perceived link with trade facilitation and trade related policies. The course focuses on application and implementation aspects of trade facilitation. It therefore takes a case study method of interrogation of pertinent policy issues and measures thereby providing participants with an exposé of best practices in the formulation of policies and implementation of trade facilitation measures. The training focuses on specific trade instruments that have a bearing on the viability of trade facilitation measures. Amongst variety of measure considered include advance ruling, release and clearance of goods, transit, border agency cooperation, appeals procedures, pre-shipment inspection, publication and availability of information etc.

 

Rationale for the Course

The entry into force of the WTO’s Agreement on Trade Facilitation has an effect of obliging countries to bring their trade facilitation and related polices and practices into conformity with the WTO legal regime. The agreement subjects customs measures that were traditionally treated independent from trade policies to multilateral trade rules. By so doing, it intermingles trade facilitation measures and policies with existing trade policy and applicable sectoral related rules with the effect of bringing them under one regulatory regime. In practical terms this implies that countries can no longer treat their multilateral commitments unitarily. On the contrary, sectoral initiatives and policies such as those on Agriculture, Transport, Standards, Immigration, Energy, Health and such like sectors that have trade facilitation dimension must be treated cohesively and in recognition of their functional and legally mandated relationship with trade facilitation. However, most countries are yet to forge functional relationship between and amongst trade policy, customs measures and policies and sectoral policies and measures. In the context of sectoral preservation of domestic policy space as against implementation of trade facilitation measures, there is glaring need for countries to reconcile in respect of their trade and non-trade related the implementation of their respective sectoral international obligations and commitments, policies with the need to forge policy coherence

 

Expected Training Outcomes

  • an ability to think critically, strategically and independently,

  • an acquirement of conceptual and practical underpinnings of international rules and policies underpinning the economic and legal aspects of trade facilitation.
  • a deep understanding of the intricate relationship between trade facilitation measures and distinct sectoral policies and measures.
  • 
a deep appreciation of trade facilitation’s conceptual and implementation complexities and opportunities within multilateral, regional (at REC and continental levels) and domestic contexts.

  • a multi-dimensional appreciation of approaches to implementing trade facilitation as against other legitimate equally important sectoral legal obligations of countries
.
  • an advanced knowledge on best practices and approaches on the implementation of trade facilitation measures.

Fees and other costs

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Mombasa, kenya

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 24th – 28th June 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

Least Developed Countries (LDCs) in general and Low-income sub-Saharan African countries in particular have not been able to benefit from the growth of international trade and globalisation during the last decades. While most other developing countries have been growing and reducing poverty, the LDCs and the sub-Saharan African low-income countries have been left outside this process. One explanation for the poor results among these countries is an overall lack of knowledge of the functioning of the international trade system and the possibilities for LDCs to improve trading conditions through the development of proper trade policies and to negotiate better conditions for themselves in the multilateral and regional trade agreements.

 

With the purpose to broaden and deepen the understanding in LDCs of the importance of trade and trade policy for development, this course addresses key issues that officials working in trade related institutions must be abreast of. The course will therefore introduce participants to key concepts in the economics of trade and trade policy; key aspects of multilateral trade regulatory framework and how it relates to the various continental trade related regulatory frameworks and then conclude with a consideration of negotiations in international relations.

 

Expected training outcomes

  • Ability to think critically, strategically and independently on trade policy, trade regulation and trade negotiations subject matter. 

  • Identify and understand basic determinants of trade and trade policy. 

  • Analyse the economic implications for developing countries of divergent forms of trade 
regulations. 

  • Understand and interpret the legal framework that regulates international trade 

  • Exposing participants to the political economy questions of domestic, regional and 
international trade regulation

 

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Arusha, Tanzania

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 8th  – 19th July 2019

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

A sound competition policy, along with a good competition law regime helps in fostering competition, economic efficiency, consumer welfare, investment and freedom of doing business. This course is therefore designed to inculcate necessary knowledge and skills among the participants to deal with the issues relating to anticompetitive agreements, abuse of dominance, exclusion as well as exploitative practices, enforcement of competition law against anticompetitive agreements and addressing bottlenecks to completion enforcement in Sub-Saharan Africa. In light of growing economic integration agenda, in particular, current and prospective market integration in a form of customs unions, the importance of competition policy and law cannot be overemphasized. At the national level, the importance of competition policy has increased, particularly in recognition of the need to ensure that SMEs thrive and continue to contribute in national economies.

Further, due to the fact that regional agreements hold an important potential to overcome the main obstacles in the enforcement of competition laws, the course will also examine the national and regional competition regimes from the policy and legal perspective. It will review the rationale behind the setting up of competition policy institutions at national, regional and international levels. It will further consider cooperation in the sphere of competition law and policy, regional cooperation in combating anti-competitive practices as well as enforcement of competition policies and laws.  

Who is it for?

The course is designed for policy advisers, senior decision-makers responsible for regulation and competition policy both at a national and regional economic community level.

How will you benefit?

At the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the theoretical foundations of competition policy 
and regulation; 

  • Critically examine policy issues in competition policy and regulation both at a national 
and regional level; 

  • Critically evaluate real-word cases in completion policy and regulation; 

  • Critically evaluate the different approaches to regulation and competition policy; 

  • Apply the principles of competition policy to the current practices of policy intervention 
to facilitate investment and fair competition; 
competition law areas including: merger control, abuse of dominance issues, restrictive agreements within commercial contracts, public procurement and competition due diligence. 

  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the expected role of di erent stakeholders and groups in order to ensure better market competitiveness at the national and regional level. 


Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Arusha, Tanzania.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 22nd – 26th July 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

The services sector bears increasing relevance for economic diversification and development in Africa. However, this may only be possible if African Countries put in place policies that would enable them benefit from trade in services.

Consequently, this course aims at equipping participants with knowledge on key trade in services disciplines and their relevance in the process of preparing national regulations on services. This will be achieved through consideration of the following areas: structure of the General Agreement on Trade in Services and the key principles; key approaches in liberalization of trade in services; underlying concepts for Trade in Services negotiations; tips in scheduling commitments; utility of preferential services liberalization for African Countries; relevance of rules relating domestic regulation of trade in services under the GATS and their impact on ongoing domestic reform e orts in African Countries; and the need to situate service sector policy in national development plans.

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically
  • An appreciation of how the economic characteristics of services transactions have shaped the law of services trade,
  • A deep understanding of the conceptual complexities of liberalisation of trade in services,
  • Participants will be able to better estimate and analyse potential consequences of various options in services liberalization,
  • An advanced knowledge of the role of the GATS on domestic regulation of trade in services,
  • An enhanced understanding of the linkages between international trade in services and development.

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Durban, South Africa.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 5th– 9th August 2019.

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

 

The role of African parliamentarians in international economic law making is largely residual in nature. In most countries and regions, the role of the parliamentarian is only recognized at the latter end of trade negotiations when there is almost no scope review or change deal negotiated by the executive. Furthermore, the structure of most parliaments is designed to largely follow domestic economic issues with little attention paid to economic integration developments in the African continent and at the global level. However, it is trite that trade and trade policy create winners and losers at least in a relative sense. There is therefore an urgent need for parliaments to get engaged in the developments that ultimately shape the future of the African continent and that of their countries and regions. This is important given that the clashing twin objectives protecting national policy making space versus the need to consolidate individual country based markets into regional and continental markets so as to be competitive in global markets are always on the table. Consequently, the ongoing negotiations at the AU on AfCFTA serve as an example of a prime area in which these two objectives are at play. This calls for active participation of parliamentarians with a view to not only shaping the economic future  of their countries but also that of the African continent.

 

Trade Policy and Regional Economic Integration Training Course for Parliamentarians aims at familiarizing parliamentarians with economic issues subject to international trade negotiations and their implications on their regions as well as their countries. The course will focus not only on the economic dimensions of international trade agreements and negotiations but also their implementation implications. The training will inevitably focus on the political economy on international trade negotiations with a view to providing context to the historical foundations of international economic law and recent developments as well as potential developments. Most importantly, the training will focus on domestic dimensions of international trade including an overview of checks and balances that must inform parliaments interaction with the executive, the private sector and the civil society. The training will provide an exposé of global best practices and link on key pillars of the economic agenda that underpins.

Expected training outcomes

  • An ability to think critically, strategically
  • An appreciation of the economic effects of trade policy
  • A deep understanding of the conceptual complexities of liberalisation and their implications on the domestic economy and regional integration
  • Understanding the historical aspects of political economy of international trade
  • An advanced knowledge of the role of parliamentarians in the negotiations and formulation of international trade norms and rules
  • An enhanced understanding of the linkages between international and regional to the national economic and development agenda
  • Understanding trade policies that are subject to international trade negotiations and their relationship to national policy space
  • An ability to reconcile the need for domestic policy space and creating competitive regional and continental markets
  • Knowledge of accountability mechanisms associated with negotiation and implantation of trade agreements
  • Review rationale behind creating consultative and substantive links with various stakeholders and constituents

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

 

Venue: Durban, South Africa.

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 19th– 30th August 2019

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org

Overview

The remarkable pervasive growth of internet in the last few years and its related technologies as well as its promise to continue permeating and disrupting brick and mortar understanding and operation of international trade has created new ways of communicating and trading. The underlying technologies creating new transaction avenues are creating digital economy that in majority of cases most regulatory systems are ill equipped to deal with. The aggregate impact of Internet and its associated technologies on international trade has manifested itself through e-commerce.

Lauded for its efficiency and effectiveness, e-commerce incentivizes traders and consumers’ migration to virtual markets albeit rendering the domestic, regional and international trade and trade related regulatory frameworks ill-equipped to seize opportunities and address challenges arising therefrom. The need to fully understand the growing centrality of e-commerce in international trade and its relationship to trader, consumers and regulation including its cross –border dimensions cannot be over estimated.  Deep understanding the opportunities and challenges with regard to implications of e-commerce on consumers, traders and trade regulation as well as its sectoral dimension is therefore key to rationalizing the extent to which existing African regional economic integration and domestic regulatory regimes take e-commerce in its manifold manifestations into account. This is important given that there is no doubt that the cumulative effect of the Internet through ecommerce challenges existing and prospective trade and trade related sectoral policies. It further redefines what constitutes business transactions and purports re-engineering and reconceptualization of business supply chains. Furthermore, it challenges current revenue raising and collection approaches.

Expected training outcomes

  • Understand the foundations and importance of E-commerce and outline a basic model of the Internet technology infrastructure as it relates to ecommerce
  • Analyze technologies employed in ecommerce including its software dimensions ranging from algorithms, data storage and processing to source code and their implications on international trade
  • Examine the interface of ecommerce and its underlying technologies and ecommerce business models with domestic, regional and international trade and trade related regulations
  • Explain Internet trading relationships including Business to Consumer, Business-to-Business, Intra-organizational trading.
  • Describe the key features of Internet, Intranets and Extranets and explain how they relate to each other in the context of ecommerce
  • Assess the effect of changing technology on traditional business models and multilateral trading system
  • Discuss the significance of Internet based content and social networks in E-Commerce and evaluate e-commerce markets and transactions, including supply chains, E-tailing products and services
  • Discuss key regulatory, online security, tax and revenue models as they relate to E-Commerce at domestic and cross-border levels
  • Understand the infrastructural requirements for well functioning E-commerce markets in Africa and assess electronic payment systems in African and other parts of the world
  • Demonstrate the extent to which existing African trading regimes at domestic, regional and continental levels take e-commerce regulation and market development into account
  • Discuss regulatory aspects of ecommerce and their impact on consumers and traders.
  • Consider ethical and legal issues related to e-commerce technologies such as manipulation of graphic and sound information, privacy and control of electronic media
  • Understand the productive capacity dimensions of ecommerce and analyze its relationship with physical and regulatory infrastructure

Fees and other costs

The fee for the programme will be payable in US dollars and will cover tuition, presentation material and other documentation. It also includes lunch and refreshments during each working day. Discounts are available for every 3 or more delegates registered from the same institution.

Venue: Kigali, Rwanda

NB: Subject to agreement with clients, the course may be offered in any other venue of convenience to participants.

Dates: 18th– 29th November 2019

How to apply

Prospective participants should apply through the trapca’s website www.trapca.org or send an email to admissions@trapca.org